Headed north into Riverside County yesterday. A 26-mile out-and-back for some quick climbing, good vistas, and a fun stretch of downhill switchbacks dropping into Temecula, where I can often glide upwards of 45-50 mph on a good day, though I only hit 38 yesterday.

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The only hiccup on my way out of town occurred about a mile from my house. A man in a white pickup-truck with scraggly hair and a beard that wasn’t even trying to be kept, flagged me down because he needed help. This was on E. Mission Rd. headed towards I-15. Normally I don’t get off my bike, even for friends, but when somebody needs help, that’s a no brainer.

“Hey man, do you know where the weed store is…?“ He asked.

Huh…? Feedstore…? I replied. I’m deaf in my left ear and I really thought he said feedstore.

“No! The weeeeeeed store, man…!”

Oh, I said, it’s in that building over there. I pointed in the direction of the only commercial building nearby, assuming it was somewhere in there, though I honestly had no idea where it was. I just wanted to get back on the road. I hope he found his weed. I found hillsides covered with wildflowers that would serve me just as well, probably better.

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I was thinking about used motorhomes for much of my ride. I almost bought one two nights ago, and I mean, I almost bought one. An ‘86 Winnebago with 32,000 original miles on it, in pristine shape, for only 6K. This was my dream house. I opted not to pursue this one, but the fact I am looking at and considering them more frequently — daily, confirms to myself that I really am getting closer.

When I do buy one — a used motorhome, it isn’t going to be for weekend recreation or as a desert, beach, or mountain toy. This rolling tiny house I’m searching for, which I have not bought yet, will be my forever home.

Anyone who knows me well, knows that I plan on living in a small motorhome for an extended period once I get into retirement or semi-retirement. A minimalist for much of my adult life, and now in my late 50s, I’m beginning to see the headlights at the end of the tunnel. In an unstable world with an ever-changing economy, a house that is suitable to live in, that also gets 20 miles per gallon, is my kinda house.

I have no intention though, of going to grand or pursuing anything fancy — spending $50,000 or more on such a thing. When that day comes when I do make the purchase, I want to be able to pay cash for it. Not having any debt is a big part of my retirement plan. I will make sure that it is in good condition, has been well-maintained, and ensure that I continue to maintain it well once it becomes mine.

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Though tiny houses are now all the rage, the ridiculousness of how complicated they are becoming increases each year. Hint: if you require granite countertops for your tiny house, you’ve missed the point of tiny house. Besides, I’ve done the math 100-times over, it makes much more sense for me to live in a small motorhome than in a tiny house.

I grew up fascinated by the story of Dorian Paskowitz, the Stanford educated physician and surfer, who along with his wife, raised nine children in a series of pickup-truck campers, at the San Onofre beach here in Southern California, among many other places they traveled in those campers. To me, Doc Paskowitz is the patron saint of minimalism.

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So when I ride up and down these roads each day, occasionally glancing up at the  exaggerated tract homes, the million dollar homes, and the weekend motorhomes that are often in those driveways, and as glance into traffic, occasionally seeing an old motorhome from the 70s or 80s, and one that’s in good condition, my eyes light up. I think to myself, someday that’s gonna be me — that’s my dream house.  And of course, I’m talking about the old motorhomes, not the huge houses up on the hills. I’ll just have to figure out how to store 6 or 8 bikes in or on it.

This is what I think about when I ride… Jhciacb

Yesterday’s Ride…
Bike: Bomer The Kreeps
25.5 miles
1,900’ climbing
14.9 mph avg
1,700 calories
Yesterday’s earworm: Delta Dawn, by Tanya Tucker.

Whether you ride a bike or not, thank you for taking the time to ride along with me today. If you haven’t already, please scroll up and subscribe. If you like what you read, give it a like and a share. If not, just keep scrollin’. Oh, and there is this from Tanya Tucker. Enjoy…!

11 thoughts on “Tiny Rolling House…

  1. For as long as I’ve known you, whenever I see tiny rolling homes I say “ oh there’s a good one for Roy !” And now I have the munchies looking for the feedstore. Love me some Delta Dawn brought me back to 1972 Dad got orders back to Fort Gordon Augusta GA.
    Thanks for this !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Brian! If you’re ever out there and see a 1989 Toyota Dolphin for under $5000, and it looks like it’s in good shape, buy it for me and I promise I’ll pay you back within a day…

      Like

  2. Lack of planning on his part does not constitute and emergency on your part 🙂
    I hope you get your motorhome and show up in my part of Florida one day as you are heading for the Conch Republic, Roy.
    Nine children is not being a minimalist.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good point on the copious kids! Florida? Could happen someday. I always tell people, if they ever get to a point where they can’t find me, it means I have faked my death and started a new life in Key West under the pseudonym Ry Conen… fairly simple name change.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Doc Paskowitz! I know about Doc and also have met Izzy Paskowitz, who comes to the east coast every summer with his Surfers’ Healing people that make a special beach/surfing day for autistic kids!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Ruth. I think we had this conversation once before, since I work with young adults who live with autism. Izzy’s foundation does great work, and on this coast also, in other places around the country and around the world. Considered by many the least likely to succeed out of all of the Paskowitz kids, I think he’s doing more to help the world than any of them. Again, thank you.

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  4. Doc Paskowitz’s story is a wonder. Was that Winnebago a Chieftain, by chance? You and a couple of small fur-kids could live well in one of those. I never understood the appeal (or the insane cost) of a tiny house over an RV–makes not much sense to me either, but life would be boring if we all liked the same thing

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was, in fact, a Chieftain. I’m already kicking myself, because it’s not available anymore. Truth is, I would like something a little bit smaller than that, I think that’s the main reason I didn’t pull the trigger. Something as small as a late 1980s Toyota Dolphin will work just fine. Search goes on…

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