Our love of guns began when the first Indian fell backwards, as we worked our way west to exploit every possible resource and take possession of all lands. And if those resources or those lands became threatened, we depended on guns to assure our possession of them — because we valued the resources and lands more than the humanity which was already a part of them. 

And in the decades and centuries to follow, as we asserted our providence over all which lay before us, we became culturally inseparable from our guns and the idea that killing is an acceptable aspect of progress. 

Guns became costars in the American story. First in books, then radio, movies, television, and subsequently in every aspect of popular culture. No American story is complete without guns and killing, even if we have to peel back the layers to find them. Behind every innocent story there’s a gun or a killing waiting to break through and be seen. 

Guns are in our dreams, our toys, our games, and and even in our fantasies. Killing, as a way out of an unwanted circumstance, is part of our cultural DNA. Don’t like where something is headed…? Kill whatever’s in the way. We even use guns against our own bad days — 52% of suicides come with bullet holes.

This isn’t going to end anytime soon because we accept it with open arms. As soon as were done complaining and sending thoughts and prayers, we binge watch the next violent television series, with liberty in killing for all. We do far too little — almost nothing to discourage our children from the enjoyment of killing and guns as a form of entertainment. 

As long as our mass shootings remain in the single digits, double digits, and triple digits, we’re going to be cool with it. Want to get America to pay attention to our acceptance of killing culture…? It’ll take thousands of people going down in just a few seconds. Even then, the so-called conservatives in Congress would defend every aspect of gun and killing culture. Forgetting, of course, that the word conservative comes from conserve — to use sparingly, to act sparingly, to allow sparingly. 

I’m certainly not the first person to point any of this out. This is the first time though, I’ve been willing to share my deepest feelings on what’s going on. 

Gun culture and killing will be part of the American story so long as we, the authors, keep writing it. We cling to guns and killing, above all, because they were the midwife to our birth.

This is what I think about when I ride… Jhciacb

Post Script: 

I’ve been sitting with these thoughts for a while — keeping them to myself for fear of offending friends and associates. 

In December 1993, my wife, my three-year-old daughter, and I had lunch at a Chuck E. Cheese in Aurora Colorado. The following evening a man entered the building and shot four people, all employees. Though the killings took place was after hours, I had been in that room with my three-year-old the day before.

Six years later I was in San Diego, looking to purchase a house. My wife and then nine-year-old daughter stayed behind in Littleton Colorado — home of Columbine High School, to pack up and sell our home there. I was driving down Interstate-8 in San Diego when the announcer on NPR broke the story of the Columbine shooting. I was shaking and crying so uncontrollably, I had to pull off to the side of the road and gather my emotions before calling home.

Last month in Boulder Colorado, in the King Soopers grocery store where 10 people were shot and killed, I knew people who were in there that day. That was my community once upon a time. 

I’ve trained with guns for military and law enforcement purposes. I grew up with BB guns, learned to shoot .22s in Boy Scouts, and qualified on several pieces during my time in the military.

My statement above is more about the fact that, in popular culture, historic and contemporary, guns, killing, and entertainment are intertwined. The influence of guns and killing in popular culture has contributed to the increase of mass shootings, beyond any doubt, and has been studied and documented for decades.

I don’t see guns as being evil. I would like to see gun use and safety taught at the high school level, and students given PE credit for the class. Put a real gun in the hands of a 14-year-old, and he or she is far more likely to respect its power than somebody who’s 23 and holding one for the very first time.

This week by the numbers…

Bikes Ridden: 7

Miles: 186

Climbing: 8,400’

Mph Avg: 15.4

Calories: 10,620

Seat Time: 12 hours 13 minutes

Whether you ride a bike or not, thank you for taking the time to ride along with me today. If you haven’t already, please scroll up and subscribe. If you like what you read, give it a like and a share. If not, just keep scrollin’. Oh, and there’s this from Jeff Beck And The Big Town Playboys. Enjoy…!

5 thoughts on “Bang Bang Bang…

  1. I appreciate what you wrote, Roy. As you, I am very comfortable using a gun, and would just as soon be fine if they didn’t exist. To help with all this, I’m good with going upstream as much as possible, but in the end, fewer guns has to be what is. I still don’t understand how they can ignore the WELL REGULATED part of the second amendment. Thinking about what you said this in your essay, to the best of my recollection, there has never ever been a gun in my dreams.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I’m never one to second guess The Doc, but are you sure you never dreamed of a six-shooter while watching The Lone Ranger…? A BB gun as a kid….? An AK when the lady in the checkout aisle wrote a check that required manager approval…?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think most young men are fascinated by guns, and that’s part of my point.

        As I said in the essay, I wish firearms were taught to high school freshman. Holding a gun as a 14-year-old changed my perspective on them, And gave me a great respect for them.

        As for guns in dreams, I’ve suffered from violent dreams my whole life. There hasn’t been a week ago by in years that I haven’t dreamed about gunfire, plane crashes, and explosions. The dreams with gunfire are the ones that really get to me…

        Liked by 1 person

  2. The old man surviving The Chosin Reservoir,2 tours of Viet Nam,31 year career vet. Shell shocked before PTSD is now epidemic. Never ever wanted to see and or have another gun in his presence/home. Today too many deal with Behavioral Mental Health,PTSD,substance abuse,leading to gun violence/abuse giving them a sense of relief and sick healing to kill and hurt others. To be triggered and lose it, giving them a sense of power to pull the trigger. Until the mentally ill can be controlled/managed those having guns will not be controlled.

    Liked by 2 people

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