Each morning in contemplative prayer, among the first things I express gratitude for is that my father raised me with a sense of humor. And if it was my father who raised me with humor, it was my older brother who helped me understand that could be applied to just about any difficult situation to make it more tolerable. To know frustration, anger, or pandemonium as a Cohen, is to do so looking for the punchline.


As a caregiver for my aging mother, humor has been my drug of choice to help cope with the all the stresses, surprises, and frustrations that go with caregiving. Humor has helped make difficult circumstances tolerable and helped keep my disposition in check, most of the time. Incorporating humor into difficult times, not only makes them less difficult, it can even make them fun and memorable, for both me and my mother. And that’s the hook for me — that when I make a joke around my mom, even if she’s a part of the joke, she laughs. Seeing a little old lady laugh can be as uplifting as watching an old dog run, something else I get to do nearly every day of my life.

I never use humor against my mother or place her as the object of my frustration. I don’t belittle her, insult her, or use jokes to make her feel poorly about herself, ever. I just throw her into the story somewhere —sometimes in the middle, more often in the periphery, and place my obnoxious or sarcastic comments around her. In a way, that humor acts like a shield, protecting her from the inner me.

In the course of a day, my mother is likely to lose something, drop something, forget something, and be unable to process a moment. When I say in the course of a day, I mean every couple of hours or so. As any of these unfold, they will most likely happen at inconvenient times. After four years, my ability to reach for a punchline rather than an F-bomb has become seamless.

I had thought of citing some examples to insert here, and had even outlined a few to be expanded on. I realized though, it’s one thing to make a joke involving my mother in the heat of a difficult moment. It’s something entirely different to try and explain that joke to people who may not even know me or her. Joking about one’s mother is one of those things that, the more you say, the worse you sound, so I’ll just end things right here.

Each morning in contemplative prayer, among the first things I express gratitude for is that my father raised me with a sense of humor. Immediately after that, I ask forgiveness for those moments when my sense of humor failed me and I lost my shit.

This is what I think about when I ride… Jhciacb

This Week By The Numbers…

Bikes Ridden: 6
202 miles
8,900′ climbing
15.7 mph avg
12,000 calories
12 hours 52 minutes seat time

Whether you ride a bike or not, thank you for taking the time to ride along with me today. If you haven’t already, please scroll up and subscribe. If you like what you read, give it a like and a share. If not, just keep scrollin’. Oh, and there’s this from Susto. Enjoy…

3 thoughts on “Sipping On Humor…

  1. One of the first things I liked about yo, Roy, was your great sense of humor! Interestingly, my dad once told me he really liked my sense of humor.
    In my job, with all the high stress situations, humor was one of my coping mechanisms. Sometimes I was misunderstood, or my serious superiors just frowned at it – so it goes.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. One of the things I always appreciated about the show, M*A*S*H, what is the humorous banter that took place during the surgical scenes. I can’t imagine doing that type of work without it…

      Like

  2. Right on brother, I too embraced you for who you are and your great sense of humor.
    With all the stresses in life, laughter is the best remedy. If we can’t start by laughing at ourselves then we have a problem.Tonight I lost my shit, failed cussing and yelling when I got home opening the bag of Carl’s Jr. they F’d up our order. Poor Toby was cowering. I felt like an ass. Susan broke the ice calming me down by making me laugh.
    Thank you for this today, I needed this.

    Liked by 1 person

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